Who We Are

Current Horses

Currently, the ranch supports between twenty-five and thirty horses. Some of our horses came from wonderful homes, and others were rescued from severe neglect, starvation and/or abuse. Because the ranch was founded, in part, as an equine rescue and rehabilitation facility, we acquire our horses in nearly every imaginable way. Since CPYR has no law enforcement abilities, we cannot confiscate horses in need. Consequently, the ranch purchases nearly all the horses it rescues. Their freedom is not free. To date, the ranch has assisted in over three hundred horse rescue operations.

  • Remnant

    Remnant

    Unknown, Possible Tennessee Walker

    By the time hurricane Katrina made landfall, it had strengthened into a category five storm. With sustained wind speeds of over 150 mph, virtually everything in its path was in grave danger. As the levies failed and waters started to rise in southern Louisiana and Mississippi, those who were not able to move their livestock out of harm’s way, simply opened the gates and prayed. The aftermath of the storm revealed that most of these animals did not survive—most.

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  • Robby

    Robby

    Arabian/Pinto

    There are so many qualities we, as a staff, look for in a horse that is part of our children’s riding program. One of the most valuable qualities is a willingness from the horse to trust the human as their leader. We look for horses that demonstrate a simple faith. A trust in the fact that we will never hurt them in any way and—because of this trust—they choose to do whatever is asked of them. This perfectly describes Robby.

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  • Shamis

    Shamis

    Breeding Stock Paint

    The first time we met this little filly, something very unusual happened. She was not suffering in any way. In fact, her care was exemplary. What struck our heart was the fact that her elderly owner was a widowed woman experiencing financial distress. She was doing her level best to care for her horse ranch amidst her failing resources. Clearly, the horses were not suffering-—the owner was.

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  • Silas

    Silas

    Draft Cross

    Silas came to CPYR in the fall of 2015 along with his pasture mate, Sisco. As has been the case with only a small number of equine acquisitions at Crystal Peaks, these two geldings were purchased out of as much of a desire to help a human in need as it was to bring on new horses for our Session Program.

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  • Sisco

    Sisco

    Quarter Horse

    Sisco came to CPYR in the fall of 2015 along with his pasture mate, Silas. As has been the case with only a small number of equine acquisitions at Crystal Peaks, these two geldings were purchased out of as much of a desire to help a human in need as it was to bring on new horses for our Session Program.

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  • Taylor

    Taylor

    Arabian

    Even though she was missing 150 pounds, she was beautiful. Still spunky after standing on feet that hadn’t been trimmed for a year, she had not given up. After spending time with this Arabian mare, Kim and Kelsie knew they could not leave her behind. The mare was not alone. Her pasture buddy (Abigail), also missing a significant amount of weight and standing upon shockingly long hooves, must come as well. Mercifully, the owner released these two into our care.

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  • Tomahawk

    Tomahawk

    Pony of America

    Nearly everyone who sees him has the same response . . . “Oh my Goodness! What a LOUD, crazy-colored pony!” To which we add, “Yup, and he has a LOUD, crazy personality to match it too!” We were delighted when friends of the ranch wished to assist us by providing a wonderful home for one of our new untrained mares. Instead of a “payment” for the mare, it was their hope that they could give us a little horse that was too small for their needs. Boy, were we in for a surprise!

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  • Zeke

    Zeke

    Quarter Horse

    Once again, I found myself at Bend Equine Medical Center. Marshall and I were working together to carefully load and unload a frightened horse for a check-up. While at the clinic, I noticed something. More specifically, I noticed . . . someone. Wherever I went, he watched me intently with one blue eye and one brown eye. He was inquisitive, curious, always asking with his eyes for me to come close. Finally, I did. He was outside standing in a tiny paneled corral on the lawn. As I approached him, he bobbed his head up and down in anticipation.

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  • Zephyr

    Zephyr

    National Showhorse

    In 1998 Troy and Kim were called to investigate a large herd of nearly 60 horses that were in peril. From that rescue, Crystal Peaks adopted five neglected youngsters. The five new arrivals were all two year olds with the exception of one slender three-year-old National Showhorse. This frightened colt captured Troy’s heart and soon the two were inseparable friends. When the colt was old enough and strong enough to carry Troy, he became his primary riding horse.

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